MCMP Summer School Mathematical Philosophy for Female Students 2019
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Content

Program

Room Arrangement

DateAddress, Room
28.07.2019 Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, room A120 (Kleine Aula)
29.07. - 02.08.2019 Richard-Wagner-Straße 10, room numbers in program below
03.08.2019 Professor-Huber-Platz 2, room W401

Sunday, 28 July

TimeTopic
16:00 - 16:45 Registration.
16:45 - 17:00 Welcome.
17:00 - 19:00 Reception.

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Monday, 29 July

TimeTopic
08:00 - 09:00 Registration.
09:00 - 10:30 Introductory Lecture I.
10:30 - 11:00 Coffee Break.
11:00 - 12:30 Introductory Lecture II.
12:30 - 14:00 Lunch Break.
14:00 - 15:30 Introductory Lecture III.
15:30 - 16:00 Coffee Break.
16:00 - 17:30 MCMP Fellows’ Sessions.

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Tuesday, 30 July

TimeTopic
09:00 - 10:30 Lecture Stream I.
10:30 - 11:00 Coffee Break.
11:00 - 12:30 Lecture Stream II.
12:30 - 14:00 Lunch Break.
14:00 - 15:30 Lecture Stream III.
15:30 - 16:00 Coffee Break.
16:00 - 17:30 Poster Session.

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Wednesday, 31 July

TimeTopic
09:00 - 10:30 Lecture Stream I.
10:30 - 11:00 Coffee Break.
11:00 - 12:30 Lecture Stream II.
12:30 - 14:00 Lunch Break.
14:00 - 15:30 Lecture Stream III.
15:30 - 16:00 Coffee Break.
16:00 - 17:30 MCMP Fellows’ Sessions.
18:00 - 19:30 Evening Lecture.
19:30 - 21:00 Reception.

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Thursday, 1 August

TimeTopic
09:00 - 10:30 Lecture Stream I.
10:30 - 11:00 Coffee Break.
11:00 - 12:30 Lecture Stream II.
12:30 - 14:00 Lunch Break.
14:00 - 15:30 Lecture Stream III.
15:30 - 16:00 Coffee Break.
16:00 - 17:30 MAP Round Table.

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Friday, 2 August

TimeTopic
09:00 - 10:30 Parallel lectures.
10:30 - 11:00 Coffee Break.
11:00 - 12:30 Parallel lectures.
12:30 - 14:00 Lunch Break.
14:00 - 15:30 Parallel lectures.
15:30 - 16:00 Coffee Break.
16:00 - 17:30 Parallel lectures.
19:00 Summer School Dinner.

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Saturday, 3 August

TimeTopic
09:00 - 10:30 Student presentations.
10:30 - 11:00 Coffee Break.
11:00 - 12:30 Student presentations.
12:30 - 12:45 Wrap up and closing.

Abstracts

Anna-Maria A. Eder (University of Cologne): Norms in Epistemology -- Evidential Norms and Coherence Norms

Two kinds of norms are central in epistemology: evidential norms and coherence norms. Unfortunately, they can be in tension with each other and lead to epistemic conflicts. The overarching aim of this lecture course is to introduce both kinds of epistemic norms and to show how one can elucidate debates about them by using methods and tools from formal epistemology.

The first part of the lecture course introduces and reflects upon methods and tools in epistemology. The focus is on idealizations, and methods and tools in formal epistemology, e.g., explication as a method of conceptual clarification, and logic and probability theory.

The second and third part of the lecture course concentrates on epistemic conflicts that arise from both kinds of epistemic norms: evidential norms and coherence norms. The second part deals with intra-personal epistemic conflicts. These are conflicts that arise for individual agents, for instance, when different epistemic norms require an agent to be in incompatible epistemic states. The third part of the lecture course focuses on inter-personal epistemic conflicts, which are conflicts that arise among different agents. For example, they arise when there is disagreement among agents.top

Gillian Russell (UNC Chapel Hill): Barriers to Entailment

A barrier to entailment is a thesis that claims that sentences of a certain kind, Y, never follow from premises of another kind, X. A very famous example is Hume’€s Law: it says that no normative sentences follow from premises that are descriptive. But other barriers to entailment€—though still well known in philosophy—are much less controversial: claims about the future never follow from claims about the past, claims which say that things must be a certain way don’€t follow from claims that merely say how they are, general claims don’€t follow from particular claims, context-sensitive sentences never follow from non-context sensitive sentences etc. In this lecture stream we will begin by looking at some influential arguments concerning barriers to entailment—especially proposed counterexamples—and then examine the prospects for formulating and proving them with respect to appropriate logics: e.g. first-order predicate logic for the claim that you can’€t get general claims from particular ones, tense logics for the claim that you can’€t get a claim about the future from claims about the past, modal logics etc. This lecture stream will presuppose that you have taken at least one previous course in logic and have some familiarity with classical sentential and predicate logic, but you will not need to already know about modal, tense or other logics beyond that, as the course will serve as an introduction to a range of logics, brought together around the theme of barriers to entailment.top

Lena Zuchowski (University of Bristol): Philosophy of Algorithms and Simulations

Digital technologies pervade all aspects of our life: for one, they allow us to put this course description into hypertext; save it on a digital network; and have you view it on a handheld digital device! Beyond the ubiquity of its technologies, the digital world is inhabited by a host of strange entities - thinking machines, learning algorithms, virtual lifeforms - whose existences provides philosophy with unique epistemological, metaphysical and ethical challenges.

In this course, we are going to look at how digital language learning differs from how humans learn languages; will analyse the particular epistemological challenges of 'opaque' deep-learning algorithms; and tackle the question of whether there can be algorithmic ethical decision making, focusing on automatic corrections for language biases and the current proposals for algorithms governing the behaviour of self-driving cars.