MCMP Summer School Mathematical Philosophy for Female Students 2017
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Lecturers

Stephan Hartmann is a Professor for Philosophy of Science at the Faculty of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and the Study of Religion at LMU Munich, Alexander von Humboldt Professor, and Co-Director of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP). His current research interests include formal social epistemology (especially models of deliberation, norm emergence, and pluralistic ignorance), the philosophy and psychology of reasoning, intertheoretic relations, and (imprecise) probabilities in quantum mechanics. For more information, visit his website.

Katherine Hawley is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of St Andrews. Before taking up a lecturing position at St Andrews she was a Henry Sidgwick Research Fellow of Newnham College, Cambridge. Katherine works on metaphysics, in particular on the problem of persistence, identity and time. Katherine currently holds a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for a project on the ethics and epistemology of trust, promising, and competence. She is the author of How Things Persist (Oxford University Press 2001), and Trust: a Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press 2012). For more information, visit her website.

Hannes Leitgeb is a Professor for Mathematical Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics at the Faculty of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and the Study of Religion at LMU Munich, Alexander von Humboldt Professor, and Co-Director of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP). His research Interests lie primarily in logic, epistemology, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of language, cognitive science, philosophy of science, and history of philosophy. For more information, visit his website.

Cailin O'Connor is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science at University of California, Irvine. She works in philosophy of biology, philosophy of science, and evolutionary game theory. Her current research, under her NSF grant "Dynamics and Diversity in Epistemic Communities," involves using formal models to explore the effects of diversity on inquiry and the dynamics related to diversity in academic and other research groups. She has also explored the evolution of diverse phenomena including linguistic vagueness and ambiguity, learning generalization, perceptual categorization, natural kind terms, and guilt. For more information, visit her website.

Rineke Verbrugge is a Full Professor, holding the Chair of Logic and Cognition at the University of Groningen's Institute of Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Engineering, ALICE. She is also the leader of the Multi-agent Systems Group at that Institute. In 2008, she was awarded a NWO Vici grant for the project "Cognitive systems in interaction: logical and computational models of higher-order social cognition," and in 2009 she won the Educator of the Year Award of the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences of the University of Groningen. Her research interests include applications of logic in artificial intelligence and cognitive science, multi-agent systems, and higher-order social cognition. For more information, visit her website.

James Owen Weatherall is a Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science at the University of California, Irvine. He works primarily on the mathematical and conceptual foundations of physics, with a focus on classical and quantum field theories, though he also has interests in other areas, such as general philosophy of science and philosophy of economics. He holds PhDs in philosophy and in physics and mathematical science and an MFA in creative writing. For more information, visit his website.