MCMP Summer School Mathematical Philosophy for Female Students 2017
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Lecturers

Roy Cook is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Minnesota, and a research fellow at the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science. He works mainly in philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of logic, and philosophical logic, but he has also written on the history of analytic philosophy, the aesthetics of comics, and Lego bricks. Roy is well known for his outstanding work on semantic and other paradoxes, on which he has published extensively. Roy is also a specialist in Frege, and has many interesting publications on (neo)logicism. At the moment, he is writing a book on a solution to the Bad Company problem. For more information, visit his website.

Stephan Hartmann is a Professor for Philosophy of Science at the Faculty of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and the Study of Religion at LMU Munich, Alexander von Humboldt Professor, and Co-Director of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP). His current research interests include formal social epistemology (especially models of deliberation, norm emergence, and pluralistic ignorance), the philosophy and psychology of reasoning, intertheoretic relations, and (imprecise) probabilities in quantum mechanics. For more information, visit his website.

Juliette Kennedy is Associate Professor at the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Helsinki. Her main research interests span logic and mathematics, their history, and their philosophy. She has published extensively on the foundations of mathematics, set theory and its model theory, strong logics, and various topics in the history of logic, though she has also reflected on aesthetical aspects of mathematical practice. She has also written about art in connection with her (avocational) curatorial practice. Currently, she is pursuing a research project on the invariance of mathematical content across formal frameworks, based on the ideas of her 2013 BSL paper entitled "On Formalism Freeness: Implementing Gödel’s 1946 Princeton Bicentennial Lecture". For more information, visit her website.

Hannes Leitgeb is a Professor for Mathematical Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics at the Faculty of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and the Study of Religion at LMU Munich, Alexander von Humboldt Professor, and Co-Director of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP). His research Interests lie primarily in logic, epistemology, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of language, cognitive science, philosophy of science, and history of philosophy. For more information, visit his website.

Katrin Schulz is Assistant Professor of Logic in the Department of Philosophy, University of Amsterdam, where she received her PhD in 2007, and is a member of the University's Institute of Logic, Language and Computation. From 2013-2016, she was the director of the BA program in philosophy, and in 2011, her course Logische Analyse was recognized with an award as the best BA course in the University's Faculty of Humanities. Much of her research has been on topics on the interface of linguistics and philosophy, especially the semantics of conditionals. Her current research focuses on the interaction between conditional sentences and causality, and possible consequences for cognition. For more information, visit her website.

Alessandra Tanesini is Professor of Philosophy at Cardiff University. She is the author of An Introduction to Feminist Epistemologies (Blackwell, 1999), of Wittgenstein: A Feminist Interpretation (Polity, 2004), and of several articles in feminist philosophy, the philosophy of mind and language, epistemology and on Nietzsche. Her current work lies at the intersection of ethics and epistemology and focuses on epistemic vice, prejudice and ignorance. For more information, visit her website.